The Power of Noticing in Conflict Resolution
Mar
19
10:00 AM10:00

The Power of Noticing in Conflict Resolution

The Power of Noticing in Conflict Resolution with Abby Chroman

In this session, Abby will facilitate a discussion about self awareness in interpersonal and group conflicts. As a group we will explore experiences like expectation, assumption, and perception, and discuss ways that noticing reactions can help to reduce harm.

Abby Chroman helps launch and lead social entrepreneurship initiatives at Portland State University, and is an MA candidate in Conflict Resolution and Collaborative Governance. She trains small business owners, academics, and community organizers in conflict management and collaborative decision-making, and is particularly interested in conflict resolution for institutional and social change. Before PSU, Abby worked at Ashoka, where she helped strengthen global networks of leading social entrepreneurs.

Please note there are only 10 spaces available for online video participants. All others are welcome to sit in on the livestream and can participate via chat. The video of the workshop will be recorded and available as a resource for Doing Theory members. 
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Allyship, Intersectionality & Honesty with Tanya Pluth
Jan
29
2:00 PM14:00

Allyship, Intersectionality & Honesty with Tanya Pluth

For this online discussion Tanya will present to the group and facilitate a conversation on the following three points:

1.     What is Intersectionality? How can it support a practice of non-lying in activism?Intersectionality theory can be a powerful tool for unmasking. Exploring Intersectionality can unmask the points at which privilege or oppression taught us habits of lying or ignoring our experiences and the experiences of others. We can use Intersectionality to break these habits and engage more honestly.

2.     What does it mean to be an Ally? The role of the ally and why honesty is necessary to working in, or with, this role.

3.     Loving fear. These two words don’t often go together. In putting these two words together, a cognitive dissonance is created that can lead to insight: what can be revealed through a loving response to fear, whether your own or someone else’s? 

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